July 12, 2015 – Peterborough Marina to Young’s Point – Lock 27 – 15.1 nautical miles and eight locks traveled

The front hatch on the doghouse above the stateroom needed to be sanded and varnished. This didn’t get done at Fairton before we left and it had been bugging us for most of the trip. As it was a beautiful sunny day and we were in a marina with access to electricity I decided it was the opportune time to take this hatch cover off, use the sander on it and varnish it. This I did and while waiting for the varnish to dry I went to the Boaters World marine supply store while Vicki went to the grocery store for some last minute items. When we returned the hatch cover was tacky enough so that I could move it onto the boat and prepare the boat for departure.

We pulled away from B26 slip at exactly 1200 noon and a short trip across Little Lake put us at lock 20. Ashburnham, Lock 20 had been backed up earlier in the day. We waited as a tour boat came into the lock and then locked down. This boat had a folding bow.

Tour Boat with the folding bow at Ashburnham Lock 20

Tour Boat with the folding bow at Ashburnham Lock 20

Tour boat with folding bow from the side

Tour boat with folding bow from the side

We were fortunate enough to be able to pull in with three other boats and head up the 12’ lift for the 0.6 sm trek to the Peterborough Lock 21. This is a lock we had been looking forward to seeing and locking through. It is a lift lock where the entire basin of water and boats is picked up with little effort as the opposite side of the lock has the same sized basin filled with water going down. This lift is 65’ so we made a big jump all at once. Another nice thing about this type of lock is that the water is not being put into or drawn out of he basin while the boats are being lifted so there is no surging around in the basin. You can just tie the boat off to the lock sides and then be free to run around the boat and take pictures and converse with your neighbors.

Looking at bottom of opposite lift lock that is filling with boats bound down stream while we head up stream

Looking at bottom of opposite lift lock that is filling with boats bound down stream while we head up stream

Peterborough Lift Lock as we go up.

Peterborough Lift Lock as we go up.

Peterborough Lift Lock undercarriage.

Peterborough Lift Lock undercarriage lift piston.

It seemed pretty high when you are sitting on you boat looking out - Peterborough Lift Lock

It seemed pretty high when you are sitting on you boat looking out – Peterborough Lift Lock

Peterborough Lift Lock operator with guest in control room.

Peterborough Lift Lock operator with guest in control room.

Top gate on opposite lock that opens when boats go into the lock.  It lays down and you go over it.

Top gate on opposite lock that opens when boats go into the lock. It lays down and you go over it.

Peterborough Lift Lock - looking out the back when we were almost to the top.

Peterborough Lift Lock – looking out the back when we were almost to the top.

We only made 15.1 sm good on this day because we got such a late start and then we went through eight locks, some of which had to be turned around before we could enter. By turned around I mean a complete cycle of load, raise, empty, load, lower, empty before we could enter. It was another beautiful day so we traveled until 5:45 pm when we reached Young’s Point.

There is a place in Young’s Point known for its good ice cream so we hustled to make the 6:00 PM closing time. We just made it and the ice cream lived up to its reputation.

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